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A room without books is a body without a soul  — Cicero

3 December 7, 1941: Letters from Hilltop House

 

On the morning of Sunday, December 7, 1941, Anne Powlison was preparing to serve breakfast to her two daughters and three guests at their hilltop home in Lanikai, Hawai’i. The house overlooks Kaneohe Naval Air Station. Their attention was caught by flames and smoke billowing from the air base. They soon learned that it had been attacked by Japanese planes. Moments later, as they absorbed the shock of that news, Anne looked out the window and saw the second wave of Japanese planes flying by at eye level, unleashing more bombs on the air base. A plane could be seen crashing into the bay.

 

The hours following the attack were filled with panic, rumors of invasion, blackouts, and emergency services fighting fires and tending to the dead and wounded.

 

Against this backdrop of fear and terror, one of the Anne’s first concerns was for her son Peter, a student at faraway University of Washington. While all these events were fresh in her mind, she immediately wrote him a detailed letter, describing the horror of the attacks and reassuring him that she and the rest of the family were okay.

 

Anne continue to write to Peter every other day or so through the rest of December. In her letters she hopes that eventually the mail will reach him and entreats him to write soon and let them know that he is okay.

 

These contemporary letters that begin on “the day that will live in infamy” are poignant and moving. In a few pages Anne conveys her fears, her mother’s love, and a resolution to bear up under “the trying days ahead of us.”

 

For those of us who weren’t yet alive in 1941 or for those who lived on the mainland thousands of miles away, Anne’s letters bring alive emotions and fears of those who experienced the attack as no film or book could do.

 

Peter kept the letters and eventually they were brought back to Hawai’i put into storage. Long forgotten, they were recently discovered and thus this book came into being. Dockside Sailing Press. Paperback 106 pp, 1 map, 19 illustration, $10.00, e-book $4.99. (10 reviews, all 5 stars).

DECEMBER 7, 1941 LETTERS FROM HILLTOP HOUSE

  •  

    Paperback (106pp, 1 map, 19 illustrations)

    eBook (10 reviews, all 5 stars)

     

    SPECIAL ORDERS: SIGNED COPIED OR BULK ORDERS

  • December 7: Letters from Hilltop House by Cosette Harms, is a compilation of letters written by her grandmother Anne Powlison starting on Pearl Harbor day, December 7th and continuing until New Year’s, 1942. That fateful morning, Anne was preparing to serve breakfast to her two daughters and three guests at their hilltop home in Lanikai, Hawai’i. The house overlooks Kaneohe Naval Air Station. Their attention was caught by flames and smoke billowing from the air base. They soon learned that it had been attacked by Japanese planes. Moments later, as they absorbed the shock of that news, Anne looked out the window and saw the second wave of Japanese planes flying by at eye level, unleashing more bombs on the air base. A plane could be seen crashing into the bay. The hours following the attack were filled with panic, rumors of invasion, blackouts, and emergency services fighting fires and tending to the dead and wounded. Anne’s first thought was for her son Peter, far away at the University of Washington. Knowing he would be concerned, she wrote to him every other day. The letters were saved, but were lost for more than 70 years until recently discovered by Anne’s granddaughter Cossette. Reading these contemporary letters will give you an entirely new perspective on the horrors of that day.